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Refrigerating honey bees to fight mites, colony collapse

Posted on April 26, 2018 at 1:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Really interesting research out of Washington State University that could help improve honey bee colony health by improving management of the #1 honey bee pest: varroa mites. #pollinatorhealth Read more.

Photo by Scott Bauer, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

Orchard forecast model predicts future of crop

Posted on March 2, 2017 at 3:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Decision Aid System may be able to predict honeybee foraging and fruit size, among other parameters. Read more.


Can WSU researchers breed a better bee?

Posted on November 30, 2016 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Bees that are adapted to various climates and who can resist diseases are the focus of research at WSU. Read more.


Better diet helps bees tolerate more pathogens study shows

Posted on February 25, 2016 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

According to a recent study at Oregon State University, bees fed a good diet of pollen are able to tolerate higher levels of the Nosema pathogen. Read more.

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Update on bees in Washington

Posted on August 24, 2015 at 12:25 PM Comments comments (0)

WSU researcher soon will publish findings of neonicotinoids in urban and agricultural landscapes. He encourages planting acres and acres of flowers as an effective solution for helping pollinators. Read the full story.


Honeybee Fall and Rise

Posted on March 25, 2015 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

by Peter Loring Borst

Honeybees in Decline

By now most people have heard of the “unprecedented losses” of the honey bee; some tabloids have even gone so far as to warn of its impending “extinction.” Are these losses unprecedented? Are these stories even true? It’s pretty hard to make a claim of unprecedented losses, if one hasn’t really delved into the historical background of the art, science and business of keeping bees. Sad to say, a l...

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Beekeeper Starved Bees, Caused Massive Bee Death

Posted on August 15, 2014 at 3:45 AM Comments comments (0)

The latest Oregon bee deaths were a case of "classic starvation," not pesticides.

 

By Eric Mortenson, Captial Press

Read the original article with photos at: http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20140812/starvation-blamed-in-bee-deaths-expert-says

Although a veteran commercial beekeeper said “classic starvation” induced by inexperie...

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Pesticides not detected in Clackamas County bees

Posted on August 11, 2014 at 7:05 PM Comments comments (0)

ODA lab analysis shows no evidence linking honeybee deaths to pesticides


Pesticides not detected in Clackamas County bees


August 11, 2014... Laboratory analysis of dead honeybee samples taken from hives in Clackamas County this summer show no detection of pesticides. According to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, which conducted the testing and analysis, other factors are likely to be responsible for the death of thousands of bees from colonies owned by...

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Pesticide Bee Lawsuit Proceeds

Posted on April 23, 2014 at 1:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Judge allows pesticide bee lawsuit to proceed

by Mateusz Perkowski Published: April 21, 2014 6:53PM

A lawsuit over the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regulation of "neonicotinoid" pesticides will proceed despite several legal arguments being rejected by a federal judge.

A federal judge has thrown out several claims in a lawsuit filed by beekeepers ov...

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Study: Flower Strips Increase Pollinator Numbers and Diversity

Posted on April 7, 2014 at 1:00 PM Comments comments (0)

New scientific study shows that blooming strips can increase pollinator diversity The 2013 results of the “Pollinator Diversity Project in Southwestern Germany” are out and provide scientific evidence of the power of flower strips. The test plots, ecologically enhanced with an abundant supply of wild flowers, show a steep increase in both the range of different species and the number of individual pollinators.

 

The study wa...

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